Analog Signal Chain real world problem solutions: Technology and Tools
    • Mar 4, 2015

    Differential to single ended: What happens when you use only one differential amplifier output

    Many applications require the conversion of a differential signal to single ended. Some common examples are an RF DAC buffer or a coaxial cable driver. Most of the time you can accomplish this with a magnetic transformer, but sometimes a transformer won’t work. If that’s the case, can you use a fully differential amplifier (FDA)? The answer...
    • Feb 27, 2015

    JESD204B: How to measure and verify your deterministic latency

    In my last post, I presented a three-step process for calculating the deterministic latency of a JESD204B link. In this post, I’ll explain: 1) how to choose your release buffer delay (RBD) to ensure a deterministic latency, and 2) how to measure and verify the expected deterministic latency. Choosing the appropriate RBD value As discussed...
    • Feb 25, 2015

    What are you sensing? Active shielding for capacitive sensing, part 2

    Thanks for tuning into part 2 of this series on active shielding. In my last post , I talked about the benefits of shielding and how it helps mitigate parasitic-capacitance interference from your capacitance measurements. Today, I’ll discuss shield sensor designs and how the size and placement of the shield in relation to the sensor electrode...
    • Feb 23, 2015

    How to save power using load switches

    Thanks to the Internet of Things revolution, we’re seeing more devices connected to the cloud via Wi-Fi® and Bluetooth®. Load switches are commonly used to save power by disabling radios (and other power-hungry subsystems) wh...
    • Feb 18, 2015

    What are you sensing? Active shielding for capacitive sensing, part 1

    Have you been experiencing problems with fluctuations in capacitance measurements within your sensor system? There are several explanations for these fluctuations, but the most common root cause is external parasitic capacitance interference. This interference, for example unintentional hand proximity or EMI from the surrounding area, requires attention...
    • Feb 13, 2015

    Get Connected: How to extend an SPI bus through a differential interface

    Welcome back to the Get Connected blog series here on Analog Wire. In my previous Get Connected post, we examined using a general-purpose serializer/deserializer (SERDES) to aggregate multiple data inputs from different sources for high-speed trans...
    • Feb 11, 2015

    Inductive sensing: Should I measure L, RP or both?

    When devices offer different types of measurement capabilities, it’s important for designers to consider which measurement is best suited for their use case. Some inductive sensing solutions, like TI’s LDC1000 inductance-to-digital converter (LDC), have two measurement capabilities: R P -measurement: The LDC measures the equivalent...
    • Feb 6, 2015

    Solving the problems of mechanical buttons and capacitive touch sensors

    Have you ever had a button that gets stuck when you press it? Or how about one that won’t go down because something has fallen between the air gaps? While mechanical buttons can be an inexpensive option for your design, they can sometimes have problems. To solve this, a capacitive touch interface has been incorporated into a vast number of...
    • Feb 4, 2015

    Precise industrial data acquisition: The heart of the matter

    The primary function of nearly every industrial application of electronics is to perform some sort of operation or function (usually with an embedded processor) based on the value of a physical “real world” analog signal. For the embedded...
    • Jan 30, 2015

    CAN bus arbitration: To yell and back

    In the real world, if two people speak at the same time, how do you determine who should speak? Sometimes it’s the one who talks the loudest, and that’s essentially how a controller area network (CAN) bus works. In a CAN bus, all transce...