Drive in to see how TI is engineering the future of automotive.
    • Oct 18, 2017

    Next-generation FPD-Link III devices add speed and flexibility to Advanced Driver Assistance Systems

    As advanced driver-assistance system (ADAS) applications such as front camera and camera-monitoring systems (CMS) use camera imagers above a 2MP resolution more widely, video data-transfer speed requirements increase. These ADAS architecture shifts are driving the next generation of Flat Panel Display (FPD)-Link™ III devices. FPD-Link III serializer...
    • Oct 10, 2017

    The multi-switch detection interface: integrated features for smaller, more efficient designs

    Automotive body control modules (BCMs) are electronic control units that manage numerous vehicle comfort, convenience and lighting functions, including door locks, windows, chimes, closure sensors, interior and exterior lighting, wipers, and turn signals. Specifically, BCMs monitor different driver switches and control power to corresponding loads in...
    • Oct 4, 2017

    Bluetooth® low energy makes automotive systems more automatic

    It’s 7 a.m. on a Monday morning. You’re walking toward your car with coffee and lunch in one hand while on a phone call with the other hand. Now, where are those keys, and how are you going to reach them with your hands full? No worries! Your smartphone’s got you covered. Your phone connects to your vehicle using Bluetooth low energy...
    • Sep 20, 2017

    Automotive gateways: the bridge between communication domains

    Cars use communication protocols such as Controller Area Network (CAN), Local Interconnect Network (LIN), FlexRay, Media Oriented Systems Transport (MOST), and Ethernet to communicate between different electronic control units (ECUs). For example, a ...
    • Sep 13, 2017

    Maybe hindsight can be better in 2020!

    While today’s drivers rely heavily on mirrors to monitor their surroundings, tomorrow’s drivers may be able to leverage more advanced systems. In fact, the National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration estimates that requiring carmak...
    • Sep 6, 2017

    Comparing capacitive and ultrasonic kick-to-open sensing

    Automotive manufacturers are using both capacitive and ultrasonic sensing in “kick-to-open” features and parking-assistance applications. As part of a passive-entry, passive-start (PEPS) system, these sensors can add convenient hands-free operation to sliding doors, hatchbacks and trunks. Because both the capacitive and ultrasonic sensing...
    • Aug 16, 2017

    The seat remembers: Brushed DC motor ripple counting drives innovation in full-featured memory seats

    My parents have an SUV that they share between them. When I go home, I might also use their car to visit old friends or run errands. When all three of us are using the same car, we each have to adjust the driver’s seat height, the distance from the steering wheel and the pedals, the steering wheel height, the angle of the chair back, and the angle...
    • Aug 2, 2017

    Understanding current sensing in HEV/EV batteries

    When I was six years old, I got a remote-control car as a present from my dad. With just a click of a button, I was able to control the car and it was running all around my home. One day, my brother and I suddenly got into a fight and broke the remote-control car into pieces. I was curious to look inside and see how it worked. I learned that remote...
    • Jul 27, 2017

    Discrete SBCs: versatile and scalable solutions for any application

    A system basis chip, or SBC, is an integrated circuit (IC) that combines many typical building blocks of a system including transceivers, linear regulators and switching regulators. While these integrated devices can offer size and cost savings in a number of applications, they don’t work in every case. For applications where an SBC isn’t...
    • Jul 13, 2017

    Why are you still driving automotive motors with relays?

    With the advent of smaller and smarter integrated circuits (ICs) in automotive electrical systems, it’s time to start addressing the elephant in the room: Why are we still controlling motors in sunroof modules, window lifts, power locks, tailgate lifts, memory seats, compressors and pumps with relays? Sure, relays are cheap and simple to design...