TI is a global market leader that leverages its rich history in advanced motor drive and control, with broad analog and microcontroller portfolios, to deliver complete motor system solutions.
    • Aug 31, 2015

    Designing an EMC-compliant interface to motor position encoders – Part 1

    Motor position encoders are widely used in industrial motor control applications such as servo drives, robotics, machine tools, printing machines, textile machines and elevators. Interfacing these encoders to the rest of your system can raise some tr...
    • Jul 23, 2015

    Motor Drive Forum Top FAQs: Understanding current ratings

    If you have ever looked for a Texas Instruments device, you have likely seen the tool shown in Figure 1. This product selection tool is a mighty instrument that can help you swiftly review hundreds upon hundreds of devices. Figure 1: Product selection tool But as the saying goes, garbage in gets you garbage out. So understanding the various...
    • Jul 20, 2015

    Teaching Your PI Controller to Behave (Part II)

    Dave Wilson, Motion Products Evangelist, Texas Instruments In my previous blog on this topic, we briefly reviewed the history of the PI controller and presented two forms that are commonly used today. Regardless of which form you use, the frequ...
    • Jul 20, 2015

    Teaching Your PI Controller to Behave (Part I)

    Dave Wilson, Motion Products Evangelist, Texas Instruments Richard Poley manages the training activities for our C2000 microcontrollers (MCUs), and co-teaches the TI Industrial Control Seminar series with me. (If you have never attended one ...
    • Jul 13, 2015

    Motor Drive forum Top FAQs Part 2: How to estimate motor regeneration and VM pumping

    Motor regeneration is a common problem that occurs in motor-drive systems. Many designers have to select a motor supply voltage (VM) rating of twice the nominal level, which adds to the system cost. Fortunately, if you can first understand the pumping details, you can understand the necessary VM margin. In the first post in this series on frequently...
    • Jun 30, 2015

    Simplifying gate driver design for brushed DC motors

    Are you looking to drive a simple brushed DC motor? Do you need to use discrete MOSFETs to drive a bunch of current through a giant brushed motor with little time for development? When you grab an off-the-shelf gate driver, you always see a diagram like Figure 1: just choose two resistors and you’re (theoretically) good to go. Figure...
    • Jun 26, 2015

    Motor start-up techniques: Part three

    I have discussed sensorless motor start-up with our InstaSPIN-FOC™ technology in part one of this series, followed by a discussion of how to generate sufficient torque at start up and maximize it while spinning your motor in part 2. In this thi...
    • Jun 19, 2015

    Motor drive validation: Keeping our parts in your hands

    Have you ever seen this video with a cat wearing a miniature shark costume and riding a robotic vacuum cleaner? For the cat lovers out there this video is every bit as awesome as it sounds. If you happen to be a dog lover, not to fear! If you check out the related videos sidebar you can see videos of dogs doing the same thing. As a validation engineer...
    • Jun 9, 2015

    Under the hood of a 3-D printer – Part 1

    In a previous post, I introduced a TI Design reference design for a 3-D printer controller board shown in Figure 1 and gave a brief rundown of some of the key TI devices enabling 3-D printers. Today, I’ll provide more background about 3-D printing in general. This might be old hat to those who are well-versed in 3-D printers, but may turn on a...
    • Jun 3, 2015

    How a dual operational amplifier works in motor-drive applications

    This post is co-authored by Andrew Leverette. In my last blog post, I introduced an integrated solution for a high-current amplifier application. I talked about the advantages of TI’s ALM2402 dual-operational amplifier over a discrete solution and how it is useful to save your board space while packing critical features like over current protection...