Technical solutions, industry trends and insights for designing and managing power supplies.
    • Jul 20, 2016

    Power Tips: Multiply your output voltage

    Voltage multipliers provide a simple method to create high-voltage outputs at low currents. They are useful in applications such as printers, sensors and charged-particle systems that require anywhere from tens to even thousands of volts at low power. The lack of a power transformer, such as those required in a flyback converter or autotransformer boost...
    • Jul 19, 2016

    Decrease power consumption with an LDO

    A low-dropout regulator (LDO) can function as a DC linear voltage regulator at an output voltage very close to the supply voltage, which is an important factor in decreasing power dissipation across the LDO. This capability is the primary difference between a linear voltage regulator and a LDO. “Low-dropout” is self-explanatory; however...
    • Jul 18, 2016

    Why is the cloud isolated?

    In this day and age of bits and bytes, the demand for information transfer and retrieval is ubiquitous. Whether in line at the grocery store or waiting for a train, we use our smartphones to check our social media accounts, text messages or emails. But have you ever paused to think about from where this information comes? The answer is the cloud; that...
    • Jul 14, 2016

    USB Power Delivery 2.0 vs 3.0

    When I first heard about the movie “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice,” I was confused because they are both the “good guys.” Since USB has released a limited distribution of a new USB Power Delivery (PD) 3.0 specificatio...
    • Jul 13, 2016

    Can an LDO produce better-quality images in small-sized camera applications?

    Digital imaging electronics are becoming more portable and integrated into high-quality solutions. The cohesiveness of high-performance and small-sizes in camera applications is often influenced by the low-dropout (LDO) voltage regulators powering th...
    • Jul 8, 2016

    Powering Intel’s Xeon D SoC in servers, storage and switches

    Intel’s Xeon D chip, developed under the Broadwell-DE code name, is the first Xeon central processing unit (CPU) to bear the system-on-chip (SoC) title by including two physical chips in one package. This 14nm SoC has the cores, memory controllers, L3 cache, dual Ethernet and Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) Express 3.0 controllers all...
    • Jul 6, 2016

    Scope plot surgery – my boost converter has an off-ramp!

    As an applications engineer, I often get inquiries about voltage and current flows in switching regulators. And I often realize that the basic theory I learned in college doesn’t always tell the whole story. A recent case with the asynchronous boost converter in the TPS65150 LCD bias device is a good example of what I mean. Let’s start...
    • Jul 5, 2016

    Enabling 48V-to-POL single-stage conversion with GaN

    Enterprise server, switch, base station and storage hardware designers are always looking to increase power density and efficiency on their motherboards. With the addition of more components on the motherboard and a shrinking form factor, power-supply density becomes the limiting factor in reducing the area further. The smaller the power supply, the...
    • Jun 30, 2016

    Powering the Altera Arria 10 GX

    Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are increasingly complex system on chips (SoCs) that include not just programmable logic gates and random access memory (RAM) but also analog-to-digital converters (ADCs); digital-to-analog converters (DACs); an...
    • Jun 27, 2016

    FemtoFET MOSFETs: small as sand but it’s all about that pitch

    What contains more silicon: a grain of sand or TI’s latest FemtoFET product? As I sit in my beach chair watching the waves of the Atlantic roll onto the Jersey shore, my mind drifts over this question. The newly released F3 FemtoFETs, boasting a miniscule body size of 0.6mm by 0.7mm by 0.35mm (see Figure 1), can easily rival the grains of sand...