Technical solutions, industry trends and insights for designing and managing power supplies.
    • Nov 29, 2016

    Four tips to debug a boost converter

    The most efficient way to solve a problem with a converter such as failure to startup, output voltage unstable, etc. is to do some basic debugging. Basic debugging would rule out some obvious problems, like fault assembling or the wrong components and, the debugging data can help support engineers of TI to find the root cause quickly. In this blog post...
    • Nov 25, 2016

    Layout considerations for a synchronous buck converter

    Buck DC/DC converters (see Figure 1) are a very popular switching DC/DC regulator topology in many electrical and electronic applications, from cloud infrastructure to personal electronics to factory and building automation. They represent >75% of all nonisolated switching regulator topologies today. The layout of a buck converter is just as important...
    • Nov 24, 2016

    Flyback converters: two outputs are better than one

    Flyback converters are widely used for applications that require isolation between the primary and secondary. The flyback converter’s single primary switch and output rectifier provide a cost effective solution for a single output. Often times, more than one output voltage is required. Typically the flyback converter generates an isolated output...
    • Nov 22, 2016

    How to determine bandwidth from the transient-response measurement

    I’ve often thought there must be an easy way to relate the bandwidth of a power-supply control loop to its transient response, but never really found a good reference that defined this in simple terms. It seems like a straightforward problem, w...
    • Nov 18, 2016

    Input and output capacitor considerations in a synchronous buck converter

    Capacitors are an essential component of a synchronous buck converter. There’s a variety of capacitor technologies so it’s important to know what parameter of the input and output capacitors you need to consider when designing a synchronous buck converter as shown in Fig.1. Figure 1: Synchronous Buck DC/DC Converter Power capacitors...
    • Nov 17, 2016

    How to implement remote sense in your processor power design

    Hardware engineers often don’t consider the placement of the sense connection of buck converters in a power-management integrated circuit ( PMIC ) when powering an application processor. You might be thinking, “The sense pin for a buck conv...
    • Nov 16, 2016

    How to achieve higher system efficiency with high-current gate drivers

    We live in a world where designers are on a seemingly constant pursuit for higher efficiency. We want more power out with less power in! Higher system efficiency is a team effort that includes (but is not limited to) better-performing gate drivers, controllers and new wide-bandgap technologies. Specifically, high-current gate drivers can help facilitate...
    • Nov 14, 2016

    How to simulate a load switch circuit with varying input voltages and loads

    Load switches are used in a wide variety of applications, from cars to phones to servers to medical devices, so it would make sense that not everyone uses their load switch the same way. The data sheet will show the performance and specifications, but it can’t capture every application. Perhaps the data sheet shows performance with an input voltage...
    • Nov 11, 2016

    Simplifying 100V wide VIN power conversion

    A switching regulator is an efficient device when you need to perform step-down power conversion. The wide input-voltage (V IN ) space (which TI considers >30V) has seen an increased usage for these products due to new applications. Figure 1 shows major applications with wide V IN , along with their nominal bus operating voltage ranges and the...
    • Nov 9, 2016

    Power designs require powerful tools

    Your boss just asked you to create a voltage regulator design to power the latest board revision. Do you have all the tools you need to create your design? Brain, check. Books, check. Coffee, check. Tools, hmmm ... maybe … You probably know the steps you have to take, and of course, you have Google to search for anything...