Related Posts
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: How to program PMBus Devices

    This blog provides a tutorial on programming TI digital parts using TI in-house tools. TPS40422 and TPS40425 are two popular digital PMBus controllers which are used in many Point-of-Load (PoL) applications ranging from 10A to 100A. Both digital controllers are designed to start up without PMBus;...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab and TI Designs Unite

    To unite is to join, combine, or incorporate so as to form a single whole or unit. Companies unite and together become more capable. Organizations unite and offer more services. Today, TI’s PowerLab and TI Designs reference design library unite to give customers more capability, more services and...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: Get to know LLC series resonant converter design

    Resonant converters , especially the LLC series resonant converter (LLC-SRC) in Figure 1, have become popular over the last decade. Figure 1. Half-bridge LLC series resonant converter. When compared to traditional isolated PWM converters , LLC-SRC provides the following advantages: Lower...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: How to Remote Sense your Power Supply

    In high-end telecommunication applications , you often face the challenges of delivering power across large-scale printed circuit boards (PCBs). To give precious real estate to critical ASICs and processors, the power supplies are often allocated to the corner or edge of the board. To compensate for...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: Low-power Bias supply - Linear, Buck, or Flyback?

    Bias supply is essential in a power supply. Inside a power supply, you need a bias supply to power up your ICs. Outside a power supply, you may need a bias supply to power up your MCU and/or other local power supplies in your system. Many low-voltage ICs (voltage rating less than 100V DC) have the...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: How to Drive LEDs with Power Factor Correction in a Single Stage

    PFC-SEPIC LED Drivers - wow, that’s a lot of acronyms! PFC stands for “power factor correction” SEPIC stands for “single-ended primary inductor converter;” And, of course, the LED stands for “light-emitting diode.” Combining these three features into...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: My personal IoT and how I would power my favorite

    The IoT is everywhere! As my buddy Brian said in his last post , the Internet of Things is here and continuously growing. As an exercise in my own curiosity, I decided to scour the house and figure out exactly how many things we have connected to the internet. I was a bit surprised. I am junky for electronics...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: Powering the IoT in Our Homes

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is already here. There is a lot of buzz lately about the IoT and speculation about how it will shape our lives in the near future. While we have much further to go, look around your home and you will realize that we began this journey years ago. In order to understand...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: How and Why to Sense Current – Part II

    It is almost always necessary to measure some sort of current. In my last post , I covered two main reasons why you should measure current and a few ways to do so using loss current sense techniques. This post will focus on loss-less current sense techniques. Use what you already have! We are going...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: How to Avoid Conducted EMI Problems – Part II

    Following these 4 basic tips can help ease your pain when it comes to EMI compliance. Of course, the topic of EMI is a broad one, and there are many other tips that could be mentioned. Recall that in Part I of our discussion, we focused on what happens when parasitic capacitances of components in...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: How to measure current – Part I

    Power supplies generally sense output voltage and regulate it. However, it is almost always necessary to measure some sort of current. There are two main reasons why you would measure current: Current mode control purposes Current protection/regulation There are several ways to measure...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: How to Avoid Conducted EMI Problems – Part I

    Most conducted EMI problems are due to common mode noise. Furthermore, most common-mode noise issues are caused by parasitic capacitances in the power supply. For Part I of this discussion, let’s focus on what happens when the parasitic capacitance couples directly to the input wires to the...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: Power Supplies for Car Audio

    When I was in high school, I worked at a local fast food restaurant. Rather than save the money I earned for college, or something else more practical, I invested in something else - car audio. I had a Toyota Corolla with a hatchback. It was a junker (a perfect first car). Over the course of a couple...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: How to Simplify an AC/DC Adaptor Design

    If you have been shopping for low power AC/DC controllers on the TI website lately, you may have noticed the UCC28910 . This little part is kind of a big deal! It is the first foray into high-voltage integrated FETs that like many of our latest flyback controllers, includes the advantages of primary...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes - DDR memory is everywhere!

    Double data rate synchronous dynamic random access memory. Wow! That is a mouthful. Many may not even recognize the full name; it is most commonly abbreviated as DDR memory. Figure 1 shows an image of a DDR module that would be used in a PC. In this image I have placed a red circle around one of the...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: How to Regulate a Low-Voltage, NON-Isolated Supply

    In a previous post to our PowerLab Notes Blog I shared a little circuit for regulating isolated supplies with low output voltages. But, what if you are working on a non-isolated supply with a very low output voltage? The first thing that you will probably do is spend a day scouring the internet for a...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: What’s in a reference design?

    I have a 10-month old daughter. As many of you with children know, the sleeping schedule can be a bit tricky. Sometimes I find myself up late at night getting drawn into infomercials. I have seen so many I can pretty much predict what is going to happen. My favorites include: “But wait! That’s...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: How to Regulate a Low-Voltage, Isolated Supply

    I have designed numerous isolated power supplies over the years. As you might suspect, the majority of these supplies tend to have output voltages of 3.3V or higher. When I was asked to design a 2.5V isolated supply, my initial thought was that there was no way that I would be able to use a TL431 with...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: Hooray for integrated FETs!

    PCB layout is one of the most important jobs for a power supply designer. Every engineer that worked on power supplies has made a mistake on the PCB that caused the power supply to not work properly. In addition, when you let people that don’t know anything about power supplies try to do a board...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: How to Implement Synchronous Rectifiers in a Resonant LLC Half-Bridge

    Resonant LLC half bridge converters are great for offline, high power applications (200-800W) because the primary FETs benefit from zero voltage switching (ZVS). The LLC converter needs a fairly narrow input range, so it is usually accompanied by a PFC front-end. At these power levels, losses in the...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: Giving thanks to power supply tools

    Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday. Food, football, more food, what is not to love? There is no stress of buying gifts, no costumes to find. It is also a great time to spend with family and friends and give thanks for all that is in our lives. This makes for the perfect time to discuss tools that every...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: how to power low voltage, low-power industrial applications with a Fly-buck™

    Some industrial applications contain sub-circuits which require a small supply to power noise-sensitive circuits that cross an isolation boundary. In applications like PLC s, data acquisition and measurement equipment, this isolation boundary provides noise immunity. Typical sub-circuits that would require...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: When to choose multiphase

    There are many applications that can benefit from a multiphase power supply. Some examples include core supplies for ASICs or Processors, car audio supplies or memory applications for servers. Virtually any power supply can take advantage of a multiphase approach. The advantages of a multiphase supply...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: when to use a BJT power switch

    Today, it is almost a fore-gone conclusion that a switching power supply will use a MOSFET as the power switch. However in some instances, a bipolar junction transistor (BJT) may still offer an advantage over a MOSFET. Specifically, in off-line power supplies, cost and high voltage (greater than 1kV...
  • Blog Post: PowerLab Notes: Don’t be negative on negative supplies!

    Most power supply designers understand how to go from higher voltages to lower voltages (buck converter) or from lower voltages to higher voltages (boost converter). But, what if you need to generate a voltage of different polarity? These power supply designs are less common, but still very necessary...