Related Posts
  • Blog Post: 4PPoE task force discusses next-gen Power over Ethernet

    I know it has been a while since the last update about the IEEE 802.3bt Task Force (also known as the 4PPoE Task Force) in Power over Ethernet, but at least I have returned bearing good news—there was significant progress made at the last meeting. The meeting took place September 10-12 in Kanata...
  • Blog Post: Simplify your PCB layout - When 2 is better than 6

    A key contributor to the cost of any electronic product is the number of layers used for the printed circuit board (PCB). An integrated circuit (IC) pin out arrangement optimized for PCB layout will help reduce end product cost. For example, the TPS23861 4-Port, Type 2, IEEE 802.3at Power Sourcing...
  • Blog Post: Proper Detection is Important, No Fooling!

    In order for any industry standard to reach wide adoption, two required characteristics are: interoperability and safety. In the case of Power over Ethernet (PoE), the technology’s reputation for both, heavily rests on how the source (Power Sourcing Equipment or PSE controller) detects an IEEE802...
  • Blog Post: What You Should Know About Integrated MOSFET's in PoE PSE's

    Many power control and protection systems seek an integrated MOSFET along with the controlling IC in order to achieve two goals : (1) a smaller solution, (2) a lower cost solution. As you may know, such things are never as simple as we would wish. In this blog, I will examine the subject of integrating...
  • Blog Post: IEEE802.3: Compliance Revisited—Two Exciting Announcements

    A few months ago, I posted an blog about compliance testing of PoE equipment (or the lack thereof). In the article, I discussed the need for a compliance or certification program that would give end users the security and peace of mind that their PoE equipment will be safe and that it will interoperate...
  • Blog Post: IEEE 802.3: 4-Pair PoE Timeline & Meeting Recap 4

    While it may seem like a long time, the recently adopted and unveiled first official timeline to publication of the new 4-Pair PoE standard targets early 2017. Still, there is plenty of work left to be done. As the PoDL task force is still in the early stages of its work (you can see the July meeting...
  • Blog Post: IEEE 802.3bt: Not all Detection Schemes are Equal

    The next IEEE 802.3 Plenary Session, to be held in San Diego, California, is only a few weeks away. During the meeting, I will be presenting on an important topic that has yet to be investigated thoroughly: Can you safely apply power to equipment connected to a PoE-enabled switch when performing detection...
  • Blog Post: IEEE802.3bt: What’s your use case?

    As I mentioned in my May meeting recap , an ad hoc was formed to collect use cases for 4-pair PoE. Not only is this an important topic, but it gives me a chance to ask for some reader input again. Regular readers of my posts know that in addition to keeping you up to date on the progress of the 4-pair...
  • Blog Post: IEEE802.3bt: May 2014 Interim Meeting Recap

    The May 2104 interim meeting of the IEEE802.3bt task force was recently held in Norfolk, Virginia. Over the course of three days, the task force heard approximately 20 presentations including ad hoc reports, technical contributions, and baseline text proposals. All of the presentations can be found on...
  • Blog Post: The IoT and PoE: A Perfect Match

    For those of you who regularly read my blog posts to keep up with the goings on of IEEE802.bt task force (which will be meeting this week in Norfolk, VA.), I am going to change things up a bit and talk about one potential application for Power-over-Ethernet (PoE)—Connecting the Internet of Things...
  • Blog Post: IEEE802.3bt: A Guide to Understanding the Current Spec

    One of the most discussed topics during the IEEE802.3bt task force meetings is the maintain power signature (MPS) of PDs. In fact, other than things directly related to the move from 2-pair power to 4-pair power, the MPS signal level and timing is the only specification change that has been proposed...
  • Blog Post: IEEE802.3bt: Can 4-pair and 2-pair coexist?

    One of the biggest challenges that the IEEE802.3bt Task Force faces is how to define the behavior for new 4-pair devices when they are attached to legacy 2-pair devices . In fact, it is such a challenge that I wrote my very first blog post about it. In this post, I want to dive a little deeper into the...
  • Blog Post: IEEE802.3bt: March 2014 Plenary Session Recap

    The IEEE802 March 2014 Plenary Session was held last week in Beijing, China. For me, it was my first time in Beijing and my first real chance to do any sort of sightseeing in China. I was able to squeeze in visits to both the Great Wall and the Forbidden City. As for the real reason I was there, the...
  • Blog Post: IEEE 802.3bt: How much power?

    What power level do you think of when you hear “high power PoE” or “4-pair PoE”? Do you think of something along the lines of twice 802.3at (for a total of 51W delivered to the PD)? Or, do you think of something even higher (60W, 70W, or even 80W delivered to the PD)? If you think...
  • Blog Post: IEEE802.3bt: The Question of Compliance

    Are you a PoE user? Do you ever buy PoE equipment? If so, do you make sure it is compliant with the latest IEEE standard? If you just said yes to that last question, I want you to think about it again. How do you know if a part is really compliant to the IEEE Standard for Ethernet? This topic...
  • Blog Post: Power over Ethernet design made easy

    Manager: “Have you heard anything about this new PoE standard being discussed in the IEEE committee?” You: “Yeah, I just read an interesting blog about it on Texas Instrument’s website.” Manager: “Well, I was thinking our next Thin Client platform should have...
  • Blog Post: IEEE 802.3: January recap part 2 - a closer look

    In my last blog post, I wrapped up the goings on at the IEEE802.3 Interim meeting in Indian Wells, California. I wanted to follow up that post with another that dug a little deeper into some of the presentations given. Specifically, I wanted to talk about two of the specific proposals made during the...
  • Blog Post: IEEE802.3 January 2014 Interim Meeting Recap

    The first ever meeting of the IEEE 802.3bt task force took place in Indian Wells, California last week. A total of 15 presentations were given over the course of two days. While no official motions were passed and no baseline text was adopted for the 4PPoE standard, a great deal of progress was made...
  • Blog Post: IEEE 802.3: The Power Part of “PoDL”

    As the next meeting of the IEEE802.3 study groups and task forces is still a week or so away, I thought I would spend a little time talking about the IEEE802.3bu task force. If you recall from my previous post , the 802.3bu task force is the result of a successful Power-over-Data Lines (PoDL) study...
  • Blog Post: IEEE 802.3bt: What's on your wishlist?

    One of my favorite parts of the holiday season is the sense of anticipation that comes with exchanging gifts with friends and family. However, one thing that often goes overlooked is that this may make you take a step back and think about what you really want. When you combine this with the sense of...
  • Blog Post: IEEE 802.3: It's all about connections

    For this trip into the world of the IEEE802.3bt Task Force, I want to dive into the material that I presented at the November Plenary Session. My presentation, 4PPoE: Maximizing Interoperability with 802.3-2012 Devices (and other things) , addressed a method for meeting the backwards compatibility objectives...
  • Blog Post: IEEE802.3bt: Now a Reality

    For those of you who can’t attend the IEEE 802.3 Working Group meetings, I am happy to tell you that the Four Pair Power over Ethernet (4PPoE) Study Group has successfully completed its work and the IEEE P802.3bt Task Force has been approved by the working group in Dallas last week (the Power over...
  • Blog Post: IEEE 802.3: How many devices do we need?

    A few of my previous posts have addressed some of the issues with implementing a new 4-pair PoE standard . In this post, I want to take a step back and start with the most basic question: What does a 4-pair PoE system look like? Specifically, how many devices do we need at each end of the cable? ...
  • Blog Post: IEEE 802.3bt: Class is in Session

    Typical PoE System enabling equipment of varying power levels As mentioned in my very first blog post, IEEE 802.3: On the issue of Backwards compatibility , the (presumed) IEEE P802.3bt task force will need to amend the PoE standard to include a classification procedure for 4-pair PoE. These changes...
  • Blog Post: IEEE 802.3: The birth of PoDL

    As the 4-Pair Power over Ethernet (PoE) study group waits for approval to become the IEEE P802.3bt task force, I want to take the opportunity to talk about the other study group I am a part of. In July, the 1-Pair Power over Data Lines (PoDL) study group was formed after a successful call for interest...