Motor Drive & Control Solutions

Motor Drive & Control Blog

Motor Drive & Control

Motor Drive & Control

TI is a global market leader that leverages its rich history in advanced motor drive and control, with broad analog and microcontroller portfolios, to deliver complete motor system solutions.

  • Center stage with Hall sensors

    • 0 Comments
    Have you heard about TI’s family of Hall effect sensors? The first four stars are here: DRV5013, DRV5023, DRV5033 and DRV5053 . We are all curious what star roles these new parts will play. One of the more famous roles of the Hall sensor is to...
  • Spin It! - Get Your Own Stepper Motor BoosterPack! BOOST-DRV8711

    • 0 Comments
    BOOST-DRV8711 Howdy and welcome back! We made it… After all the hard work, the finished product is here, looking slick, and spinning motors. Figure 1: BOOST-DRV8711 Standalone In my previous posts , we pieced together a system, found...
  • How does TI spin your motor? #TISpinsMotors

    • 1 Comments
    Motor drive technology is always being refined and spurring innovation in how motors are designed, controlled and driven. Here at TI, we understand just how important the motor drive systems that govern motor performance are. Whether you need to precisely...
  • How to get started with InstaSPIN™ and MotorWare™ software

    • 0 Comments
    Blog post co-authored by Blessing Osakue. You have a C2000™ m icrocontroller (MCU) with embedded InstaSPIN™ motor control software, and you are running Code Composer Studio™ integrated development environment (IDE), but what’s...
  • Relief to the rescue for rapid torque, velocity and position control

    • 4 Comments
    Are you struggling with rapid development of three-phase torque, velocity, or position motion control applications? We just released the new C2000™ Piccolo™ F2805x MCU series enabled with InstaSPIN-FOC™ and InstaSPIN-MOTION™...
  • Return of the Code Magi (part 3)

    • 4 Comments
    In this series we have been discussing the challenges facing the microcontroller industry over the last few decades, and some of the steps taken by MCU companies to remain competitive in a market that is becoming more and more crowded. Recently a few...
  • The Empires Strike Back (part 2)

    • 0 Comments
    With more and more MCU suppliers pouring onto the battlefield, the entrenched players found themselves under siege. Would MCUs be forced to surrender to the same fate that DRAMs did years earlier in the commodity wars? With so much at stake, MCU suppliers...
  • Core Wars (part 1)

    • 0 Comments
    I was recently invited to be the keynote speaker at a “Technology Day” event in Milwaukee, WI. (If you have never attended one of these events, you should seriously consider it, as they provide an excellent venue for valuable interactive technology...
  • Customer reduces motor control software development from one year to one month

    • 0 Comments
    We always appreciate the opportunity to share a customer’s success story. It’s one thing for us to tell you what our technology can do, but what really matters is the functionality and time savings that motor control system developers can...
  • There is more to be discovered with Hall sensors...

    • 0 Comments
    Hall effect sensors are used extensively in motor and position control applications, thanks to their incredible simplicity and cost effectiveness. TI just launched the DRV5000 Hall sensor family! To get your feet wet in rediscovering what Hall sensors...
  • Mind spinning possibilities: Hall effect sensor bandwidth in BLDC motors

    • 4 Comments
    Here in TI’s motor team, we are constantly deluged by requests for motor drivers that can spin a motor faster and smoother. In the brushless-DC motor realm, this is pushed to the limit with stringent requirements of speed, torque ripple and jitter...
  • Part 2 - Visualize a box, now think far beyond it

    • 1 Comments
    The intent of an integrated DC motor driver is to drive one or several specific DC motor types, including a brushed DC motor , brushless DC motor or stepper motor , with built-in control logic and MOSFETs (H-bridge and half-bridge). But, there are always...
  • Visualize a box, now think far beyond it - Part 1

    • 1 Comments
    “People who refer to out-of-the-box see the box ... People who don't know the box even exists are the innovative thinkers.” - Lisa Goldenberg The intent of an integrated DC motor driver is to drive one or several specific DC motor...
  • Spin it! - Designing Your Own Motor Drive and Control System (Part 5)

    • 5 Comments
    Part 5: Do's and Don’ts of Layout Design (cont.) Howdy and welcome back! We are getting close to the finale…! In my previous posts , we pieced together a system, found our components, conquered the mighty schematic and reviewed...
  • Understanding thermal properties of motor drivers

    • 0 Comments
    When I think about thermal concerns related to integrated motor driver products, it takes me back to high school physics and a memory that has stuck with me ever since. The teacher was using a hand crank to turn a motor which was acting as a generator...
  • How to have it all: Designing next-generation industrial drive and control systems

    • 0 Comments
    Blog by Sam Sabapathy, C2000™ Microcontroller applications manager, Texas Instruments Developers of next-generation industrial drives systems are always looking for ways to differentiate their drives solution from competition by implementing...
  • Get your motor running: Brushed DC motor driver selection

    • 3 Comments
    In my last blog I discussed how to select a stepper motor driver and in today’s post, I want to continue the series by discussing how t o select a brushed DC motor driver. Integrated brushed DC drivers are much simpler than stepper or brushless...
  • Have you considered using back-emf observers for sensorless speed estimation?

    • 1 Comments
    Sensorless control is gaining in popularity for motor drive applications which don’t demand precise control, below 10% rated speed. A fan or pump drives that operate within 20% to 100% speed range are the right candidates for sensorless control...
  • Tips for driving solenoids

    • 1 Comments
    On the surface, you might think driving a solenoid or valve actuator seams quite simple. And to be honest, in most cases it is. It’s not too terribly difficult to turn current on or off. But, what if your application requires very fast turn on ...
  • Teaching Old Motors New Tricks

    • 8 Comments
    Dave Wilson, Motion Products Evangelist, Texas Instruments One of the favorite parts of my job at TI is going out into the field, meeting with our customers, and conducting motor control seminars. It gives me the opportunity to see what is important...
  • Speed control: the next big thing for sensored BLDC

    • 0 Comments
    Most brushless DC motor controllers operate sort of like the gas pedal of a car. If the pedal is pushed down some amount, the car will travel at different speeds depending on if it’s climbing a hill, going downhill, or plowing through snow. ...
  • Simulation Power!

    • 2 Comments
    Dave Wilson, Motion Products Evangelist, Texas Instruments As many of you know, I am a BIG fan of using simulation tools to unlock the mysteries of the motor control universe. With embedded model-to-code options from VisSim, PSIM, PLECS and Simulink...
  • Spin It! - Designing Your Own Motor Drive and Control System (Part 4)

    • 2 Comments
    Part 4: Dos and don’ts of layout design Howdy and welcome back! In my previous posts , we pieced together a system, found our components, conquered the mighty schematic, and reviewed, reviewed, and reviewed some more. Many people will call...
  • Why the future of motor drive and control is so important (Part 2)

    • 0 Comments
    Tim Adcock is the director of the TI Kilby Labs Motor Lab. In Part 1 of Tim’s post, he outlined the future of motor drive and control on the TI official company blog. In Part 2, Tim explains the motor drive and control technology TI has developed...
  • How to use a speed table for easy nonlinear input-to-output response

    • 0 Comments
    In motor applications, it’s suitable to respond to a varying input command with a nonlinear output response to allow compensation for a machine limitation and to provide a better user experience. For example, in an application with an analog input...