TMS320C28x Simulator User's Guide (literature number SPRU003)

 

 

              Does this User's Guide exist or any reference manual similar to it exist.  I need to configure the simulator properly to run and debug some

 

               TMS320F2812 C code.

 

                                                                      Thank you

 

 

51 Replies

  • Thomas,

    Is this what you are looking for: http://focus.tij.co.jp/jp/lit/ug/spru608a/spru608a.pdf

     

    Regards,

    John

     

  • In reply to JohnS:

    Hi, 

    The document SPRU608a makes reference to the "TMS320C28x Simulator User’s Guide (literature number SPRU003)", as noted by Thomas above.

    However I cannot find this SPRU003 document. Could you help me with this concern?

    Thank you for your help,

    Yann

  • In reply to Yann Lebrun:

    Yann,

    This document is no longer available.  In general the C28x simulators are not something we recommend to users at this time.  For C28x there are a number of super low cost development kits available.

    John

  • In reply to JohnS:

    John (apparently from Texas Instruments) wrote:

    "...the C28x simulators are not something we recommend to users at this time"

    I have been counting on using the simulator for development work off-site from the hardware.

    Questions:

    1. Did this simulator ever work?

    2. Why would you promote using the simulator in all your other documentation and then recommend not using it when asked for the User Guide for it?

    3. Where can I purchase a "super low cost development kit" for the TMS320F2809 DSP?

    4. What does the acronym TMS stand for?

    5. What does the SPR prefix in all your document file names stand for?

     

     

  • In reply to Timothy Ball:

    Hi Timothy,

    A quick word on forum usage: it is better to start a new thread (and cite the existing thread URL in the text) rather than post to an old thread (in particular, this thread was started two years ago, and should have been closed then - it wasn't because I'm sure it was just overlooked).  Once a thread has responses or gets old, it becomes less likely that someone will notice it and answer you.  Anyway, to your questions:

    Timothy Ball

    1. Did this simulator ever work?

    2. Why would you promote using the simulator in all your other documentation and then recommend not using it when asked for the User Guide for it?

    Yes, it works.  It has always worked.  I think John was referring to the limitations of the simulator for C2000 devices.  The simulator is (and always has been) just an instruction set simulator (which is true pretty much of all the TI processor simulators).  There is no peripheral support.  Since the C2000 is so peripheral intensive, the simulator doesn't cut it for most users.  People think they will be able to run their whole application (e.g., PWM, ADC, etc.) on the simulator.  You can't.  The simulator is most useful for working on non-peripheral code (e.g., a math algorithm) when you're, say, on an airplane or something.  But even then, we have tiny USB development boards for the some of the newer C2000 devices that are the size of a flash thumb drive that you could use on your laptop on an airplane (for example).

    Timothy Ball

    3. Where can I purchase a "super low cost development kit" for the TMS320F2809 DSP?

    There are no development boards specifically for F2809.  But, F2808 is basically the same thing except less flash.  I would suggest F2808 Experimenter's Kit, http://www.ti.com/tool/tmdsdock2808.

    Timothy Ball

    4. What does the acronym TMS stand for?

    TMS is not an acronym.  Rather, the part pre-fix 'TMS320' was originally used to show that the device was from TI's DSP product group.  That started 30 years ago.  C2000 lineage dates back about 18 years ago, and it took the TMS320 part pre-fix then.  TI processor families whose origins are more recent (maybe the past 8 years) no longer use the TMS320 designation.

    Another thing 'TMS' means is production silicon, as opposed to 'TMX' which means engineering samples (X for experimental I guess).

    Timothy Ball

    5. What does the SPR prefix in all your document file names stand for?

    Beats me.  It is just a prefix on a literature number.  I don't think it stands for anything.  Maybe it originally came from something.  I don't know.

     

    Regards,

    David

  • In reply to David M. Alter:

     Hello David:

    Thank you very much for your swift response.
    It is highly appreciated.
     
    I planned to use the C2000 Simulator mainly to confirm the operation of assembly code instructions and to determine which instructions produce the swiftest results. For example, I see that much of the assembly code that TI employs is for indirect addressing instead of simply direct.
     
    I downloaded the TI free Control SUITE software. However, the Code Composer Studio (CCS) selection (from English/CCS 'Getting Started with CCS for C2000') does not mention how to execute the compiler.
    Is the CCS and C2000 Simulator executed from within the Control SUITE?
    Are there simple 'Hello World' type examples available?
     
    If I purchase the F2808 Experimenter's Kit will that give me total, unlimited, and royalty-free use of the full version of the Code Composer Studio Compiler with IDE v5 at no additional cost(s) forever?
     
    TI should consider indicating what TMS and SPR stands for.
    Just a few examples of what others claim that TMS stands for follows:
        TI Mixed Signal
        TI Manufactured Semiconductors
        TI Manufacturing Services
     
    Thank you for your time and efforts,
    Tim Ball
    TDB Consulting
  • In reply to Timothy Ball:

    Tim,

    Timothy Ball

    I downloaded the TI free Control SUITE software. However, the Code Composer Studio (CCS) selection (from English/CCS 'Getting Started with CCS for C2000') does not mention how to execute the compiler.

    Is the CCS and C2000 Simulator executed from within the Control SUITE

    ControlSuite really has nothing to do with CCS.  ControlSuite is a collection of code libraries, example CCS projects, and other C2000 device stuff that is provided by the C2000 team.  CCS is the debugger provided by the TI tools team.  I encourage you to install ControlSuite and take advantage of the stuff it provides, but you still need CCS for code development and debugging.  The compilers, emulation, and simulators are part of CCS, and again, CCS is completely seperate from ControlSuite.

    Timothy Ball

    Are there simple 'Hello World' type examples available?

     

    ControlSuite has a lot of simple examples, although probably not 'Hello World'!  Also, you can use the code that comes with application report SPRA958.  This is complete and simple starter code for most of the C2000 device families.

    http://www.ti.com/mcu/docs/litabsmultiplefilelist.tsp?sectionId=96&tabId=1502&literatureNumber=spra958k&docCategoryId=1&familyId=916

    Timothy Ball
    If I purchase the F2808 Experimenter's Kit will that give me total, unlimited, and royalty-free use of the full version of the Code Composer Studio Compiler with IDE v5 at no additional cost(s) forever?

    You need a license to use CCS v5.  The experimenter's kit will come with a free license that allows you to use the eval kits, XDS100 class emulators, and the simulators.  See: http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/Licensing_-_CCSXDS100 class emulators are cheap (about $80, http://www.ti.com/tool/xds100, get the TMDSEMU100V2U-14T version).  They are slower than XDS510 class emulators, but quit acceptable for C2000 development.

    You can actually download CCS from the TI web, and install this same free license yourself (I think instructions come up when you install CCS).  You could try the simulator right away without having to buy anything.  Always use the latest one (v5.3.0 as of now):

    http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/Download_CCS

    If it looks good, you can then get an eval board or design your own board.  Up to you.  The free license is good to go, just limited to XDS100 emulators and the simulators.  No royalties.  Can use for production code.

    Good luck,

    David

  • In reply to Timothy Ball:

    Timothy Ball
     
    TI should consider indicating what TMS and SPR stands for.
    Just a few examples of what others claim that TMS stands for follows:
        TI Mixed Signal
        TI Manufactured Semiconductors
        TI Manufacturing Services
     

     
    I forgot to ask you, why does it matter?  They may very well not stand for anything.  If they do, it wouldn't surprise me if there is nobody at the company anymore who remembers where they did come from.  It was decades ago that these were coined.  It's not like TI is keeping it secret!
     
    - David
  • In reply to David M. Alter:

    Hi David:
     
    I suppose it matters because people are now under the wrong impression that TMS stands for something like: TI Mixed Signal, TI Manufactured Semiconductors, or TI Manufacturing Services.
    Normally, when one sees a few letters used consistently, especially when all are capitalized, those letters actually mean something.
    For example, GPS for Global Positioning System, RTOS for Real Time Operating System, IBM for International Business Machines, .doc for Document, or even F for Flash in TMS320F2809.
    Does the letter C in C2000 stand for something?
     
    To produce even more confusion though, we have those who choose to use words to identify something that has no relationship whatsoever to the word chosen.
    For example, the word 'cookies' used to identify data that a web browser reads from a website and stores on a PC (i.e. Personal Computer) for later retrieval.
     
    Speaking of PC, I wonder what percentage of people who use a PC every day don't realize that PC stands for Personal Computer?
    That might be a great question for Jay Leno to ask people on the street.
    Maybe he could also ask them to spell PC.
    I suppose he would get spellings such as: peecee
     
    Many years ago, I took a class about Windows NT.
    One of the students asked the Instructor what NT stood for.
    The Instructor did not know...
     
    Thanks for writing,
    Tim
  • In reply to Timothy Ball:

    >>Does the letter C in C2000 stand for something?

    The 'C' stands for CMOS.  Prior to CMOS, there was NMOS.  The original TI DSP was the TMS32010 in NMOS technology (notice, no 'C'), which dates to somewhere around 1981.  It was followed soon after by the TMS320C1x family in CMOS.  'F' stands for flash CMOS.  Next there were some 'LC' and 'LF' devices where the L stood for low-voltage CMOS.  These were 3.3V, as opposed to the previously used 5V technology.  The "L" has long since been dropped since everything became 3.3V eventually (and now we are well beyond that).  There were also some 'V' devices thrown in, for very low voltage.  So you see, these naming conventions date way back, and aren't religiously followed anymore.  Don't try to decipher them.  TI makes many different processors today.  Most no longer carry the TMS320 moniker.

    It is really not important enough to spend time on, but you've got me curious.  I know a couple of people at TI who may know where TMS320 came from.  I will ask them and reply back here.  Just for curiosity's sake.

    - David