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  • TI Thinks Resolved

DLP660TE: Pixel rendering

Prodigy 70 points

Replies: 11

Views: 5169

Part Number: DLP660TE

Am I right in thinking that this chip when used for a 4k UHD projector produces two overlaid images of 2716x1528 rather than an absolute rendering of 3840x2160 ?

  • Dave,

    Projection solutions utilizing the DLP 4K UHD chipset deliver 8.3 million pixels to the screen (3840x2160) with over 4 million micromirrors (2716x1528) and 2-position optical actuator, bringing full 4K UHD resolution to the screen by displaying two distinct and unique pixels during every frame. It meets the Consumer Technology Association (CTA) 4K standard and is classified as 4K UHD.

    Regard

    Anshul

    Anshul Jain

    anshul@ti.com

  • In reply to Anshul Jain:

    Thanks for the reply though I'm a little confused. How does two overlapping images of 2716x1528 equate to a resolution of 3840x2160 ? Surely it's just two sets of 2716x1528.

    When you say two distinct and unique pixels, don't the pixels overlap and so aren't distinct ?

    I appreciate it meets the definition of the CTA as drafted.

    Thanks for your help in clarifying my understanding.

  • In reply to Dave Howard:

    Dave,

    DMD resolution is 2716x1528 and two frames of 2716x1528 resolution are displayed time sequentially twice within 1 input frame i.e if input is at 60Hz two frames of 2716x1528 resolution are displayed at 120Hz. 2x2716x1528 = 8.3M pixels and so is 3840x2160= 8.3M pixels.

    When we say two distinct and unique pixels, they are time sequentially displayed at twice the input frame rate so in time domain they are two distinct and unique pixels.

    Anshul Jain

    anshul@ti.com

  • In reply to Anshul Jain:

    I get 2x2716x1528 is a similar number to 3840x2160 but not the same number, so don't see how you can equate the two.

    Don't the two pixels which are shown overlap ?

  • In reply to Dave Howard:

    Dave,
    TI's 4K UHD chip based projector systems takes 4K UHD ( 3840x2160) as input source and performs TI's proprietary image and video processing algorithms to create two 2716x1528 frames. These two frames are then time sequentially displayed within 1 input frame. As you said the two pixel positions do overlap between two frames. The effect of the overlap is mitigated by DLPs fast speed and image processing algorithms.

    Regards
    Anshul

    Anshul Jain

    anshul@ti.com

  • In reply to Anshul Jain:

    Thanks for explaining that. So it works like JVC's eShift does ?

  • In reply to Dave Howard:

    Dave,

    It may be similar in that it uses an optical device to shift a single imager pixel to create two unique displayed pixels. What is different is the resolution displayed:

    To my knowledge, JVC only uses 1080p panels in all of their "e-shift" products. So, the JVC projectors have 1920 x 1080 x 2 positions = 4.15 Million Displayed Pixels (Half UHD).

    The TI DLP-based solutions use a DMD specifically designed for this application; that is the reason for the somewhat unusual resolution of 2516 x 1528 for the DMD. The DLP based projectors have 2716 x 1528 x 2 positions = 8.3 Million Displayed Pixels (Full UHD).

    So, while it is similar in that it uses an optical device to create two unique displayed pixels from one imager pixel; the TI DLP solutions have twice as many addressable pixels (Full UHD).


    Regards,
    Gary

  • In reply to Gary S:

    I'm still struggling a little, just when I think I understand it. Why do you say 'two unique displayed pixels' if the pixels are overlaid on top of the other presumably by half a pixel diagonally ?

  • In reply to Gary S:

    I get it's got 8.3 million pixels, but surely the resolution is 5432x3056 with half the pixels missing rather than 3840x2160 ? I just can't get my head around why you say its 3840x2160.
  • In reply to Dave Howard:

    Dave,

    Our implementation lifts from the well established field of Super-resolution Imaging and other proprietary algorithms to move past the limitations of the DMD resolution.

    Regards,
    Gary

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