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why AWR1243 owns three Tx and four RX?

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Replies: 13

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why AWR1243 owns  three Tx and four RX?

  • Hi,

    Could you please clarify the question?

    Best Regards,
    Anand
  • In reply to Anand Gadiyar:

    hi

        In the datasheet,AWR1243 ouwns three RX and four TX,which means three  receiving antenna  wireless and transmitting antenna wireless,why?

  • In reply to user5909325:

    Hi,

    The AWR1243 has 3 TX and 4 RX antennas. Having multiple antennas like this allows you to do angle estimation for example. Having a TX antenna placed slightly apart vertically also allows you to do elevation estimation.

    Please refer to our training series on this:

    training.ti.com/mmwave-training-series

    Specifically module 1.5 covers angle estimation.

    Let me know if this answers your question.

    Best Regards,

    Anand

  • In reply to Anand Gadiyar:

    hi

         Thank you for your answer,but I has an another question,what is the effect of three TX and How does radar measure altitude?

  • In reply to user5909325:

    Hi,

    Could you please clarify the question on "effect of three TX"? What kind of effect are you looking for? (Distance? Angle?)

    Radar measures distance to an obstacle that reflects the radar signal. For altitude measurement using radar, please refer to this: en.wikipedia.org/.../Radar_altimeter

    Best Regards,
    Anand
  • In reply to Anand Gadiyar:

    hi

        I don't understand why the radar needs two output antennas and how the radar measures the target altitude.

  • In reply to user5909325:

    Hi,

    Having more than 1 TX antenna gives you more flexibility - for example, one advantage is that you can use two antennas together to increase the transmit power, and therefore extend the range. Another use can be to use the two TX antennas in a MIMO configuration to improve the angle resolution.

    Please refer to our application note on MIMO Radar for more information on this concept: www.ti.com/lit/an/swra554a/swra554a.pdf

    The target altitude detection is done using an angle-of-arrival estimation method. The concept is explained in module 1.5 of our training series: training.ti.com/mmwave-training-series

    After this, you can refer to the xwr14xx demo documentation included in SDK version 1.2.0.5. This SDK version can be downloaded from here:
    software-dl.ti.com/.../index_FDS.html

    After installation, the documentation is available here: file:///C:/ti/mmwave_sdk_01_02_00_05/packages/ti/demo/xwr14xx/mmw/docs/doxygen/html/index.html

    Best Regards,
    Anand
  • In reply to Anand Gadiyar:

    Hi

        thanks very much for your answer,I will learn it carefully!

  • In reply to Anand Gadiyar:

    hi
    sorry,I do not understand whether the training module 1.5 calculates azimuth or pitch Angle?
  • In reply to user5909325:

    Hi,

    The training module only explains the general mechanism of angle estimation. The actual angle (whether it is azimuth or pitch) depends on the physical placement of the antennas in your design.

    Best Regards,
    Anand

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