I first explored the opportunity of using the Eclipse and Net Beans open source projects as a foundation for embedded software development tools in an article a few years back. Back then these Java-based IDEs (Integrated Development Environments) were squarely targeting application developers, but the embedded community was beginning to experiment with using these platforms for their own development tools. Since then, many companies have built and released Eclipse-based development tools - and a few have retained using their own IDE.

This week’s question is an attempt to start evaluating how theses open source development platforms are working out for embedded suppliers and developers. In a recent discussion with IAR Systems, I felt like the company’s recent announcement about an Eclipse plug-in for the Renesas RL78 was driven by developer request. IAR also supports its own proprietary IDE – the IAR Embedded WorkBench. Does a software development tools company supporting two different IDEs signal something about the open source platform?

In contrast, Microchip’s MPLAB X IDE is based on the Net Beans platform – effectively a competing open source platform to Eclipse. One capability that using the open source platform provides is that the IDE supports development on a variety of hosts running Linux, Mac OS, and Windows operating systems.

I personally have not tried using either an Eclipse or Net Beans tool in many years, so I do not know yet how well they have matured over the past few years. I do recall that managing installations was somewhat cumbersome, and I expect that is much better now. I also recall that the tools were a little slower to react to what I wanted to do, and again, today’s newer computers may have made that a non-issue. Lastly, the open source projects were not really built with the needs of embedded developers in mind, so the embedded tools that migrated to these platforms had to conform as best they could to architectural assumptions that were driven by the needs of application developers.

Do you care if an IDE is Eclipse or Net Beans based? Does the open source platform enable you to manage a wider variety of processor architectures from different suppliers in a meaningfully better way? Does it matter to your design-in decision if a processor is supported by one of these platforms? Are tools based on these open source platforms able to deliver the functionality and responsiveness you need for embedded development?

Visit Embedded Insights to see the full conversation occurring across multiple communities about this and other questions of the week.

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