Seamlessly connect your world with 16 new wireless MCUs for the 2.4-GHz and Sub-1-GHz bands

Seamlessly connect your world with 16 new wireless MCUs for the 2.4-GHz and Sub-1-GHz bands
Other Parts Discussed in Post: CC1352P7, CC2652P, CC1352P, MIOTY

Omdia expects low-power wireless microcontroller (MCU) shipments to double over the next four years to more than 4 billion units. This massive influx of MCUs will result in more opportunities for wireless connectivity than ever before, with growth across a wide range of applications and technologies including Bluetooth® Low Energy, Zigbee®, Thread, Matter, Sub-1 GHz, Wi-SUN and Amazon Sidewalk. With the addition of 16 new wireless connectivity devices, we are empowering you to innovate, scale and accelerate the deployment of wireless connectivity – no matter what or how you are connecting.

Designing for wireless connectivity

The first step in the design process is to select a wireless MCU, which means choosing both the MCU platform and radio, while also selecting one of numerous communication protocols. Not only are there several protocols to choose from, but there are a variety of features within them, each with hundreds of options, that can overwhelm you. As requirements evolve or the end products multiply, it becomes difficult to update devices and software to keep up with the wireless landscape. Therefore, it’s best to select a wireless MCU that will work for both the first and future generations of a product.

Designing with the future in mind offers the flexibility to upgrade or expand products while reusing existing investments, minimizing design cycle times and optimizing product costs. New technology capabilities like lower power, smaller size, integration and new protocol features are increasing the number of wireless applications. Products such as asset trackers, consumer wearables and long-range security systems require a varying range of features from an MCU platform.

Implementing a multiprotocol system

Wireless connectivity designs require seamless communication between different types of end equipment. For example, in a security system for a large apartment building, several wireless devices work together to protect residents. If you were designing a full system solution with simple sensors and complex gateways, as shown in Figure 1, you’d need a range of wireless MCUs to address the various memory, power and cost requirements in your design.

Figure 1: A building security system in a large apartment building

The first layer of security in the apartment building might begin with a smart e-lock for each apartment entryway. A multiprotocol e-lock uses Sub-1 GHz as the long-range communication protocol and Bluetooth Low Energy for provisioning to provide unified control and monitoring for each apartment from a central security gateway. Here, it’s important to consider memory, particularly when designing multiprotocol applications.

The SimpleLinkTM multiprotocol CC1352P7 wireless MCU is a great fit for simultaneous Sub-1 GHz and Bluetooth Low Energy protocols, with 704 kB of flash and an integrated power amplifier for increased range to cover large buildings. Future upgrades to an e-lock application could require additional memory to enable over-the-air firmware updates or features enabled with the latest protocol specifications, such as coded physical layers for Bluetooth Low Energy that increase range.

Let’s look at another application example: the heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system shown in Figure 2. Again, different types of end equipment need to communicate with each other. Consider taking a thermostat and enhancing it to add long-range temperature sensors into the system so that users can monitor and customize temperatures by room.

Figure 2: An HVAC system in a large apartment building

For a thermostat gateway, SimpleLink multiprotocol CC2652P or CC1352P wireless MCUs support concurrent protocol use with a dynamic multiprotocol manager and have 352 kB of flash and 88 kB of secure random access memory to support Sub-1 GHz, Zigbee or Bluetooth Low Energy stacks. To reduce the cost of the temperature sensors, TI designed SimpleLink single-protocol CC2651R or CC1311R wireless MCUs for simplified cost-conscious applications.

Thermostat and temperature sensors have differing complexities and requirements in regards to features such as memory, size and price, which proves why choosing a wireless MCU with the right set of features at the right price is critical. It provides freedom both during the initial design process and for future innovations. The CC2562R, C2652P and CC2651P have a pre-certified system-in-package option enabling quicker time to market. In addition, software compatibility across wireless MCUs is critical to maximize investments and reuse across multiple product generations or stock-keeping units.

Saving design time and investment costs

Table 1 includes more details about the 16 new wireless MCUs (releasing throughout 2021). As you can see, you can go from a Sub-1 GHz or 2.4 GHz product with 352 kB of flash up to 704 kB of flash while maintaining the same package footprint and application programming interfaces.

Part number

Description

Supported technologies

Flash memory

SRAM + cache memory

CC1312R7

Sub-1 GHz wireless MCU

Wi-SUN
Amazon Sidewalk
TI 15.4 Stack
Proprietary radio frequency (RF)

704 kB

152 kB

CC1352P7

Multiprotocol and multiband wireless MCU with an integrated power amplifier

Wi-SUN
Amazon Sidewalk
Zigbee
Thread
Bluetooth Low Energy 5.2
TI 15.4 Stack
Proprietary RF

704 kB

152 kB

CC2652R7

Higher memory, multiprotocol wireless MCU

Matter
Bluetooth Low Energy 5.2
Bluetooth Mesh
Zigbee 3.0
Thread
Proprietary 15.4

704 kB

152 kB

CC2652P7

Higher memory, multiprotocol wireless MCU with an integrated power amplifier

Matter
Bluetooth Low Energy 5.2
Bluetooth Mesh
Zigbee 3.0
Thread

Proprietary 15.4

704 kB

152 kB

CC2672R3

Multiprotocol and multiband wireless MCU

Zigbee Sub-GHz
Bluetooth Low Energy 5.2

352 kB

88 kB

CC2672P3

Multiprotocol and multiband wireless MCU with an integrated power amplifier

Zigbee Sub-GHz
Bluetooth Low Energy 5.2

352 kB

88 kB

CC2652RSIP

7-mm-by-7-mm system-in-package wireless module

Bluetooth Low Energy 5.2
Bluetooth Mesh
Zigbee 3.0
Thread

Proprietary 15.4

352 kB

88 kB

CC2652PSIP

System-in-package module with integrated power amplifier

Bluetooth Low Energy 5.2
Bluetooth Mesh
Zigbee 3.0
Thread

Proprietary 15.4

352 kB

88 kB

CC1311R3

7-mm-by-7-mm low-cost, single-protocol Sub-1 GHz wireless MCU

Mioty
TI 15.4 Stack
Proprietary RF

352 kB

40 kB

CC1311R3

5-mm-by-5-mm low-cost, single-protocol Sub-1 GHz wireless MCU in a smaller package with 22 general-purpose input/outputs

Mioty
TI 15.4 Stack
Proprietary RF

352 kB

40 kB

CC1311P3

Low-cost, single-protocol Sub-1 GHz wireless MCU with an integrated power amplifier

Mioty
TI 15.4 Stack
Proprietary RF

352 kB

40 kB

CC2651R3

7-mm-by-7-mm low-cost, single-protocol wireless MCU

Bluetooth Low Energy 5.2
Bluetooth Mesh
Zigbee 3.0
Thread
Proprietary 15.4

352 kB

40 kB

CC2651R3

5-mm-by-5-mm low-cost, single-protocol wireless MCU

Bluetooth Low Energy 5.2
Bluetooth Mesh
Zigbee 3.0
Thread
Proprietary 15.4

352 kB

40 kB

CC2651P3

7-mm-by-7-mm low-cost single-protocol wireless MCU with an integrated power amplifier

Bluetooth Low Energy 5.2
Bluetooth Mesh
Zigbee 3.0
Thread
Proprietary 15.4

352 kB

40 kB

CC2651P3

5-mm-by-5-mm low-cost single-protocol wireless MCU with an integrated power amplifier

Bluetooth Low Energy 5.2
Bluetooth Mesh
Zigbee 3.0
Thread
Proprietary 15.4

352 kB

40 kB

CC2651R3SIPA

System-in-package module with integrated antenna

Bluetooth Low Energy 5.2
Bluetooth Mesh
Zigbee 3.0
Thread
Proprietary 15.4

352 kB

40 kB


Table 1: New devices in the SimpleLink wireless MCU portfolio

When selecting your wireless MCU, you are not only choosing the platform and radio for your current design but also preparing for future designs. With the addition of 16 new wireless connectivity devices, our expansive portfolio covers cutting-edge technologies with intuitive development tools and software, enabling you to connect any device with the right features and at the right price.

Whenever you are designing for the ever-changing world of wireless connectivity, it is essential to have freedom and flexibility. The question remains: Are you prepared to evolve with our connected world, or will you be left behind?

Additional resources

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