This thread has been locked.

If you have a related question, please click the "Ask a related question" button in the top right corner. The newly created question will be automatically linked to this question.

Identification of INA126E and INA126EA

Other Parts Discussed in Thread: INA126

characteristicsHi,

Could you please help me to identify different of INA126E and INA126EA parts. In the datasheet two parts are same. But there are two parts.

Is there any document, which express of the meaning of Suffix " E " and " EA ".

Thanks.

  • Hi,

    Could you please help me to identify different of INA126E and INA126EA parts. In the datasheet two parts are same. But there are two parts.

    Is there any document, which express of the meaning of Suffix " E " and " EA ".

    Thanks.

  • Hello Shashika,

    It appears as though this has been posted twice. I will join the posts then answer your questions.
  • Hello Shashika,

    Please refer to page 20 (Addendum Page 1) of the INA126 data sheet. There is a column labeled "Device Marking". You will notice that for INA126E or EA the marking is A26 (assuming VSSOP package).

    The difference between the "E" and "EA" versions can be found in the Electrical Characteristics table of the data sheet. For example, if you look on page 6 you will see the specifications for many parameters, including Offset Voltage. The "E" version has a typical value of +/-100uV and maximum value of +/-250uV while the "EA" version has +/-150uV typical and +/-500uV maximum.

    The best way to tell the difference is to check and see which device you ordered. Otherwise you could try measuring the offset voltage, but please understand that there is considerable overlap between the "E" and "EA" versions so you may not be able to tell the difference. Nonetheless, if you want to try this, power the device with +/-15V, short both inputs to ground, connect a 25kohm load, then place it in a high gain (e.g. 1000V/V). I recommend using a precision gain setting resistor (e.g. 0.1% 80.6ohms, which would yield an actual gain of 997.55V/V). Finally, measure the output with a precision voltmeter and then divide by the gain. You can then compare the result to the data sheet ranges and perhaps then you can tell which parts you have.