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  • TI Thinks Resolved

3D printer

Prodigy 10 points

Replies: 1

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Hi,

I'm trying to build or buy a stereo-lithography 3D printer for our lab. our desired printer should have the resolution of 1-5 micrometer (the pixel size) and preferably capable of illumination of a wide range of  wavelengths (UV- NIR- Visible).

since the resolution is the first priority and considering the fact that minimum micro-mirror pitch of DLP devices are 5.4 microns, is it possible to reach for example 1 micrometer pixel size?

Also, I saw some reference designs on the TI webpage like 

www.ti.com/.../tida-00293

But I didn't understand if this a complete 3d printer of just the DLP device and I have to design and build other parts separately.

Thank you very much for the help in advance,

Ali

  • Hi Ali,

    1) Our chipsets are generally only designed for the visible spectrum (420 nm - 700 nm or 400 nm - 700 nm), but we do have offerings in the NIR region and the UV region as well, check out our product page to sort our parts by wavelength.

    2) Yes, a 1 micrometer pixel size is possible, you would need to design your optics to focus at the proper size and distance. It is also worth mentioning that you would need to make sure that the resin you use supports a 1 micrometer voxel.

    3) All of our TI Designs are meant to provide all of files, documentation, software, etc. for you to build the design. We provide a Bill of Materials, which you can use to find the parts we used to build the design. We also provide documentation of the test results that we were able to achieve when we built the design ourselves.

    I hope this helps!

    Best regards,

    Trevor

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