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3-phase DC Motor Controller

Prodigy 190 points

Replies: 17

Views: 578

We are looking to design a 3-phase DC motor controller for an electric scooter.

The motor is a brushless DC motor, with three hall sensors, 72vdc, 40A, 3-phase motor.

The target processor is the TMS320F280x series of Piccolo™ Microcontrollers using the InstaSPIN-FOC firmware.

Our inputs are one analog 0-5vdc from the throttle, the three hall sensors, two digital inputs from the brakes, battery monitor which includes battery capacity and communications to a user interface.

Can you identify a processor that will work with our 72vdc, 40A requirement the highest voltage part I can find is 42vdc using 60v MOSFETs or a way we can signal condition to use one of the existing processors?

We also want regenerative braking, does the TMS320F28xx series have the firmware to perform this function?

Any information would be appreciated, possibly there is a reference design we can start with and modify for our application.

Thank

  • Hi Duane,

    I have moved this e2e's responsible org to the BLDC team. Expect a reply in the next business day.

     

    Hector Hernandez
    Motor Applications Team

  • Duane,

    Are you asking about the processor or the gate driver?

    This forum is for the gate driver.

    Regards,

    -Adam

  • In reply to Adam Sidelsky:

    Hi Adam,

    My question is for the gate driver. We are using the TIDM-1003 kit as a starting point but this kit is a low voltage high current design, 54vdc  50A.

    What we need is 84vdc (max battery when charged, would like to add some margin), 40A min.

    So my question is what gate drivers will work in the TIDM-1003 design that will give us the 84vdc 40A we are looking for.

    Thanks

  • In reply to Duane Smith:

    Duane,

    I would suggest you order a DRV8353R-EVM kit. This kid uses the same TMS320F28xx processor and the DRV8353R 100V gate driver chip which features smart gate drive, overcurrrent/temperature protection, as well as many other features. The EVM cannot support the 40A needed but the device is the correct one for your needs.

    Regards,

    -Adam

  • In reply to Adam Sidelsky:

    Ok are there any modifications I can do to get to the 40A?

    I cannot find any schematics or layout documentation on this kit, is there a link you can provide so we can understand the functioning for the DRV8353RH-EVM kit?

    Thanks

  • In reply to Duane Smith:

    Duane,

    These boards are designed to help you evaluate your application, they are not meant to be used as final boards.

    Please check this page for the Design files and User's Guide: http://www.ti.com/tool/DRV8353RH-EVM

    Regards,

    -Adam

  • In reply to Adam Sidelsky:

    We are not looking for a final design just the drivers that will allow us to provide 40A at 90vdc to the existing motor we have.

    It seems like TI does not have a driver that meets our needs or you would have provided that by now.

    If I cannot find the driver that will do 40A then none of this is worth it, which includes the kit.

    Regards

  • In reply to Duane Smith:

    Duane,

    Our drivers only switch the external FETs, as long as your FET can handle 40A, any driver that accepts the DC bus voltage being used.

    The DRV8353R-EVM can accept up to 100V DC bus so this should work for you. The EVM itself should handle 40A but I cannot say for sure. When you design your own board using a device like the DRV8353R, then you can build it to support 40A for sure.

    Regards,

    -Adam

  • In reply to Adam Sidelsky:

    Adam,

    The MOSFETs in this design are 100v, 100A which is what I was looking for, and the DRV8353RSRGZR can handle 95v so this works, thanks

  • In reply to Duane Smith:

    Duane,

    The power input connectors and motor output connectors are rated for 32A max so please be careful when using higher current with the existing board.

    Regards,

    -Adam

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