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PMP11282: Is this PFC a Continuous-Conduction-Mode Design?

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Part Number: PMP11282

TIDA-00776 is touted as a design that is likely to meet the new harmonic current emissions standards (IEC 61000-3-2: 2014) due to it's continuous conduction mode design. I need a bit more power, so is PMP11282 also a continuous conduction mode design? PMP11064 is similar, and I am considering both.

  • Hi Otto,

    Both PMP11282 and PMP11064 use UCC28063 which is an interleaved transition mode device. TIDA-00776 uses UCC28180 which is single phase CCM PFC. UCC28180 can supports 400 W designs if this is the power range you are interested in. Take a look at www.ti.com/.../TIDA-00355.

    Best Regards,
    Ben Lough
  • In reply to Benjamin Lough:

    Hi Ben,

    According to this TI document, interleaving results in improved efficiency over traditional single-phase continuous conduction mode (CCM), as well as reduced current ripple for higher system reliability and smaller bulk capacitor. This all seems pretty good to me. So, while the two-switch interleaved design might not be the IEC 61000-3-2: 2014 cake walk that TIDA-00776 and TIDA-00355 are implied to be, is it, at least, close to the harmonic current emissions target?

    On the other hand, continuous conduction mode implies reduced ripple current, also. Am I correct?

  • In reply to Otto Hunt:

    Hi Otto,

    UCC28063 should get you close to meeting IEC6100-3-2. Take a look at figure 7 of the EVM user guide:www.ti.com/.../sluu512.pdf. The EVM is a 300W PFC design. 

    Comparing single phase CCM to TM, yes the ripple current is generally lower in continuous conduction mode. By interleaving phases with TM, you do reduce the ripple current however. For interleaving, vs single phase, the tradeoff is lower RMS/ripple current in each phase but with increased complexity in the design.

    Best Regards,

    Ben Lough

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