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  • TI Thinks Resolved

TS5A23159: If the COM1 is current source

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Replies: 8

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Part Number: TS5A23159

Hi Team,

As I know, analog switch is often used by voltage source switch.

Could you let me know whether we could use current source as input? (COM1)

Roy

  • A closed switch behaves like a small resistor (in this case, 0.7 Ω), and can pass any voltage and current within the limits (0…VCC, ± 200 mA).

    A current source will work as long as it stays within these limits.

  • Hi Roy,

    Yes you can if the following conditions are met:

    1. The current being injected through the switch is less than or equal to the absolute max current, which is +/- 200mA for this device for normal operation.

    2. Voltage w.r.t. ground at inputs are within rated operating ranges as well. For this part the input voltages should be <= the supply voltage provided to the IC.

    Best,

    Parker Dodson

  • In reply to Parker Dodson:

    Hi Ladisch and Parker,

    Thank you for your information. Below is our using scenario. Could you let us know whether TS5A23159 could be used like below?

    And one thing would like to check : Could NC/NO pin be I/O interface? 

    Roy

  • In reply to Roy Chou1:

    Do the current source or the pull-up resistor use a supply that is higher than the switch's VCC? (This could also happen if the switch is powered off.)

    Does the pull-up resistor limit the current to less than 200 mA?

  • In reply to Clemens Ladisch:

    Hi Ladisch,

    1. Do you mean that NO pull high voltage couldn't over Vcc, is it correct?

    2. NO pin is open collector structure, we will let Ic < 200mA

    3. Could NC/NO pin be I/O interface? 

    Roy

  • In reply to Roy Chou1:

    1. Yes; when the open-collector output is off, the pull-up voltage is visible at the NO pin.

    3. What matters are the voltage and the current. I do not know what you are implying with the term "I/O interface".

  • In reply to Clemens Ladisch:

    Hi Ladisch,

    After checked, they could be I/O interface. Thank you.

  • In reply to Roy Chou1:

    Hi Roy,

    Everything Clemens has said is correct, but the one thing I am not sure of is the voltage at the NC pin from the current source. If this is over the switches VCC voltage there could be damage sustained on the part from the application. The current magnitude isn't a concern, but the voltage on the pin w.r.t. may cause issues but besides that I think the application looks fine.

    Best,

    Parker Dodson

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